Cover for UnHappenings by Edward Aubry

Edward Aubry: UnHappenings

It’s been a while since I last posted, but I got sick after coming home from the 2014 World Fantasy Convention with a metric assload of free books. But that’s not what this post is about. Instead, I want to tell you about UnHappenings by Edward Aubry and show you the cover.

Cover for UnHappenings by Edward Aubry
Cover for UnHappenings by Edward Aubry

About UnHappenings

Genre: Literary Fiction, Science Fiction, Science Fiction Romance

Publisher: Curiosity Quills Press

Date of Release­­: January 8, 2015

Cover Artist: Andy Garcia

Description:

When Nigel Walden is fourteen, the UNHAPPENINGS begin. His first girlfriend disappears the day after their first kiss with no indication she ever existed. This retroactive change is the first of many only he seems to notice.

Several years later, when Nigel is visited by two people from his future, he hopes they can explain why the past keeps rewriting itself around him. But the enigmatic young guide shares very little, and the haggard, incoherent, elderly version of himself is even less reliable. His search for answers takes him fifty-two years forward in time, where he finds himself stranded and alone.

And then he meets Helen.

Brilliant, hilarious and beautiful, she captivates him. But Nigel’s relationships always unhappen, and if they get close it could be fatal for her. Worse, according to the young guide, just by entering Helen’s life, Nigel has already set into motion events that will have catastrophic consequences. In his efforts to reverse this, and to find a way to remain with Helen, he discovers the disturbing truth about the unhappenings, and the role he and his future self have played all along.

Equal parts time-travel adventure and tragic love story, UnHappenings is a tale of gravely bad choices, and Nigel’s struggle not to become what he sees in the preview of his worst self.

Find UnHappenings on Goodreads

About Edward Aubry

Edward Aubry
Edward Aubry

Edward Aubry is a graduate of Wesleyan University, with a degree in music composition. Improbably, this preceded a career as a teacher of high school mathematics and creative writing.

Over the last few years, he has gradually transitioned from being a teacher who writes novels on the side to a novelist who teaches to support his family. He is also a poet, his sole published work in that form being the sixteen stanza “The History of Mathematics.”

He now lives in rural Pennsylvania with his wife and three spectacular daughters, where he fills his non-teaching hours spinning tales of time-travel, wise-cracking pixies, and an assortment of other impossible things.

Find Edward Aubry online

Tell your friends...Share on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on TumblrPin on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponShare on RedditBuffer this pagePrint this page
Persona 3 summoning

WFC 2014: Summoning My Persona

I’m almost ready to get in the car and drive down to DC to attend the 2014 World Fantasy Convention. It’s my first convention, I’m nervous, and I’m currently dealing with a shitload of negative self-talk.

My old fears are yelling, telling me all of the following:

  1. I don’t belong there because I don’t write traditional fantasy.
  2. Nobody will give a shit about me, even though I’m on the program with a reading on Friday night.
  3. I’m just some schmuck with a day job with a book published by a small press.
  4. I’ll probably fuck up the reading or otherwise make an ass of myself.

I’ve been tempted to say “fuck it” and not go, but that would mean that I’d have wasted the $500 I spent to get Catherine and me attending memberships. Moreover, it’s too late to cancel the hotel reservation.

So, fuck it. Even if everybody else at WFC2014 doesn’t want me there, I’m going anyway. I paid, just like them. It doesn’t matter if I’ve only published one book through a small press. It doesn’t matter that I’m not naturally sociable.

It most certainly doesn’t matter that none of them are likely to know who the hell I am. I’ll fix that in due course.

I’m going. Nobody’s going to stop me. Not even God himself, and I’ll treat him to an old-fashioned New York asskicking if he tries. I’m gonna burn my dread, summon my sociable writer persona, and fly the flag for Starbreaker and Curiosity Quills Press.

Tell your friends...Share on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on TumblrPin on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponShare on RedditBuffer this pagePrint this page
image-65.jpg

Silent Clarion – Chapter Fifteen

Chapter Fifteen of Silent Clarion, my new Before Starbreaker serial from Curiosity Quills Press, is now available.

Chapter Fifteen

We reached the ruins of a hunting cabin an hour after our conversation about life as an Adversary lapsed. Despite the darkening sky and the rumble of thunder, my reluctance to seek shelter there remained. “Michael, are you sure we should be here?”

I certainly wasn’t. Half the roof was missing, and the rest was charred. The fireplace was so ill-tended that any attempt to use it would most likely burn down the rest of the cabin. Evidence of young lovers using the place for trysts littered a corner, and I glanced at Brubaker. Was one of these used condoms his? Eww.

“It’ll be fine.” He opened a trap door, and began climbing down as lightning split the sky with an almost instantaneous roar. “Underground is safer!”

I followed, because he was right. The cellar was cleaner, too. Much cleaner, as if somebody came down here regularly and kept the place tidy. It even had working lights, once Brubaker felt around and found the switch. Since there wasn’t a couch or any chairs, I settled onto one of the cushions spread around the room. “How did you know about this place?”

“My friends and I found it a few years ago and fixed it up. We’d come here just to get away from everybody else. I changed the lock on the trapdoor so that the kids who come here to screw can’t get down here and make a mess of things.”

Suggested Listening

This song’s more about Brubaker than Naomi. :)



Read the rest at Curiosity Quills.

Cover for Silent Clarion by Matthew Graybosch. Artwork by Polina Sapershteyn Cover for Silent Clarion by Matthew Graybosch. Artwork by Polina Sapershteyn

Read the rest at Curiosity Quills.

About Silent Clarion

My curiosity might get me killed. I thought I needed a vacation from my duties as an Adversary in service to the Phoenix Society. After learning about unexplained disappearances in a little town called Clarion, I couldn’t stop myself from checking it out.

Now I must protect a witness to two murders without any protection but my sword. I must identify a murderer who strikes from the shadows. I must expose secrets the Phoenix Society’s executive council is hellbent on keeping buried.

I have no support but an ally I dare not trust. If I cannot break the silence hiding what happened in Clarion’s past, I have no future. I must discover the truth about Project Harker. Failure is not an option.

Silent Clarion is a new-adult science-fiction thriller by Matthew Graybosch, set before the events of the Starbreaker novels. Meet Naomi Bradleigh as an Adversary, seventeen years before Without Bloodshed.

Silent Clarion is serialized and published at Curiosity Quills, every Wednesday.

Links

This week’s chapter: http://curiosityquills.com/serials/silent-clarion-chapter-fifteen/

Theme song: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k-iCdqG3jp4

Silent Clarion index: http://curiosityquills.com/published-authors/matthew-graybosch/silent-clarion/

Before Starbreaker, Curiosity Quills, naomi bradleigh, new adult, science fiction, serial, silent clarion, thriller

Originally posted at http://www.starbreakerseries.com/2014/10/15/silent-clarion-chapter-thirteen/

Tell your friends...Share on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on TumblrPin on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponShare on RedditBuffer this pagePrint this page
SB-Wide-notxt-sm

Code For Your Best Friend

I recall a programming proverb dating from the mid-1990s that says, “Always code as if the guy who ends up maintaining your code is a violent psychopath who knows where you live.” A quick Google search suggests it arose in the Perl community, and attributes it to various sources.

It’s good advice, but not exactly something you’d expect to see on a motivational poster in an American workplace unless you work in a shop where management regularly jokes about improving worker morale by beating the crap out of them.

Instead, I would suggest that you design and implement your code as if the poor schmuck who will inherit your code after you leave is your best friend. Would you want your friend to chew up a bottle of aspirin a week as they try to make sense of your code? Would you want your friend to come to hate you for the suffering you inflicted upon them?

It isn’t even that hard to write code that another developer can take over without resorting to self-medication to kill the pain. We’ve known most of the principles for at least a decade:

  1. Indent your code properly. 
  2. Use meaningful variable names. Something like string driverFirstName or driverFirstName = '' is self-explanatory, but I’ve seen lazy programmers use names like drvfstnm or DRIVER_FN. And the latter, if you’re used to C and languages derived from C, is easy to mistake for a constant if you don’t check the declaration.
  3. Use meaningful method names. It’s the same principle as with variable names. A new developer is going to have an easier time understanding what a method named UpdateDriversLicenseAddress() does than if the method is called UpdDLAddr()
  4. Don’t abbreviate. As soon as you start using abbreviations, you force the next developer to spend time figuring out what the damn abbreviations mean. This breaks the developer’s flow and hampers productivity.
  5. Keep your methods short. Anything method longer than thirty lines is probably trying to do too much, and is a good candidate for refactoring.
  6. Use the standard library instead of reinventing the wheel. Admittedly, “standard library” is a C-specific term, but chances are your preferred programming language has something similar with a different name. Everything you implement yourself is more work for the next person.
  7. Don’t repeat yourself. The same functionality shouldn’t be implemented in two modules, because it will have to be updated in two modules if requirements change. It will also have to be tested twice. If you’re tempted to copy and paste code because you have a case that needs slightly different functionality, try inheriting from the base code.

You may have noticed that I didn’t say anything about commenting your code. You can comment your code if you like, or if your shop’s coding standards specify comments when declaring classes and methods to identify them and state their purpose.

But I won’t read them. I don’t trust comments in code. To paraphrase Dr. House: Comments lie. Code doesn’t. I know from experience, because I’ve been the “next guy” — and I’m nobody’s friend.

Tell your friends...Share on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on TumblrPin on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponShare on RedditBuffer this pagePrint this page
Operation Chimera Blog Tour

Excerpt: Operation Chimera

OK, I’m a schmuck. I promised to help out with the blog tour for Operation Chimera by Matthew Cox and Tony Healey, but I forgot to post my excerpt for the 28th of October. That’s embarrassing, so it’s time I rectified my mistake.

Excerpt from Operation Chimera

“Message sent, sir,” Commander Teague said.

Driscoll nodded. “Good. Now go to full communication blackout. Nothing in, nothing out. As of this moment, there will be no long-range communications of any sort. That includes any Trans- Gal messages.”

“Affirmative,” Ensign Blair said.

“Good. Put me on the overheads please, Ensign. I want everyone to hear what I have to say.” Driscoll clasped his hands behind his back and looked up at the main screen.

It took no time at all for Blair to patch him through to the entire ship’s intercom system. The audio pickup at the communications station isolated his voice and amplified it. No one on board could say they didn’t hear him.

“All hands, this is the Captain,” he said. “Several days ago, I received the mission parameters that define this vessel’s maiden voyage. The task ahead is a risky one, fraught with danger. But I am confident that together, we can achieve what needs to be achieved. Together, as a team, we can do what we came to do. This ship, the Manhattan, is so named not only because she is large, but because she is strong, resilient. As I need you all to be. Throughout our history, in the midst of devastation, men and women of all colors and creeds have always found a way of coming together to form a united front against dark forces of terror. We must endeavor to live up to the name of this ship, to the region of Earth she is named after. To the people of that region who, time and again, managed to show their strength and quality. We must show the same resilience as those brave souls did, centuries ago.

“Ladies and Gentlemen, we embark on a mission that will test the limits of every man and woman aboard this ship. It will test the depths of our resolve, our commitment, and our technology. All of you are here because you share the same goal―to end the Draxx threat. To end over one hundred years of conflict. An end to war.” Driscoll paused for effect. “We make war only to end it. That has always been our purpose. Regardless of what happens from this point on, I want everybody to try and remember that. If you feel that I push this ship, if you feel that I demand too much from you, remember why we are here. My resolve will not waver in the face of adversity. I expect the same dedication in return. Driscoll out.”

About Operation Chimera

Operation Chimera, by Matthew Cox and Tony Healey

Genre: science-fiction, action-adventure

Publisher: Curiosity Quills Press

Date of Publication: October 20, 2014.

Cover Artist: Ricky Gunawan

Available on Goodreads

Operation Chimera Cover
Operation Chimera Cover

Generations of war with the savage Draxx have left humanity desperate for a way to gain the upper hand.

A chance to turn the tide in their favor is all legendary Captain Nicholas Driscoll needs to hear to lead an expedition behind enemy lines to the Chimera Nebula – a region of space so unstable it remains largely uncharted.

Lieutenant Michael Summers sees an opportunity to matter, a chance to let future generations exist in a universe without constant war. He and other brave young cadets join the Manhattan for its first dangerous mission – to penetrate the Chimera Nebula and discover what it is the Draxx are doing in there.

But first the ship and her crew will be tested by enemies both outside and within…

About Matthew Cox

Born in a little town known as South Amboy, NJ in 1973, Matthew has been creating science fiction and fantasy worlds for most of his reasoning life. Somewhere between fifteen to eighteen of them spent developing the world in which Division Zero, Virtual Immortality, and The Awakened Series take place. He has several other projects in the works as well as a collaborative science fiction endeavor with author Tony Healey.

Hobbies and Interests: Matthew is an avid gamer, a recovered WoW addict, Gamemaster for two custom systems (Chronicles of Eldrinaath [Fantasy] and Divergent Fates [Sci Fi], and a fan of anime, British humour (< – deliberate), and intellectual science fiction that questions the nature of reality, life, and what happens after it. He is also fond of cats.

Matthew Cox, author of Caller 107, Virtual Immortality, and Division Zero
Matthew Cox, author of Caller 107, Virtual Immortality, and Division Zero

Find Matthew Cox Online:

Website | Facebook | Twitter | Goodreads

About Tony Healey

Tony Healey is a best-selling independent author. Born in 1985, he has lived his entire life in the city of Brighton, UK.

In 2011, he found his fiction published alongside Harlan Ellison and Alan Dean Foster. A year later, his sci-fi serial FAR FROM HOME became a best-selling sensation, followed by similarly successful sequels. Since then he has collaborated with authors Bernard Schaffer, Matthew Cox and William Vitka on various projects. He has also had work published by Curiosity Quills Press. He is married and has three daughters.

For the latest on Tony’s various projects, visit his site www.tonyhealey.com.

Tony Healey
Tony Healey

Find Tony Healey Online:

Website | Facebook | Twitter | Goodreads

Tell your friends...Share on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on TumblrPin on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponShare on RedditBuffer this pagePrint this page
SB-Wide-notxt-sm

Silent Clarion – Chapter Fourteen

Chapter Fourteen of Silent Clarion, my new Before Starbreaker serial from Curiosity Quills Press, is now available.

Chapter Fourteen

Without wine and unrequited lust to cloud my vision, Michael Brubaker reminded me of my brother Nathan. He was reserved without beer and nearby friends to bolster his confidence, so I resorted to leading questions to draw him out. His answers didn’t give me much, but seemed to help put him at ease.

We followed the town’s namesake river, the Clarion, northeast into the forest. Michael proved voluble once I began asking about unfamiliar plant life. A born woodsman, he seemed pleased to have a companion with whom he could share his knowledge. “Don’t you have trees in London?”

Craning my neck, I stared up at the tops of the white pines towering overhead. “Not quite like this. This is a real forest, old and wild.”

“Not that old.” Michael shook his head. He crouched, and put on a pair of heavy gloves before digging into the soft earth. After a minute’s effort, he pulled out a chunk of asphalt. Part of it was still yellow. “A road used to run this way. See those little hills off in the distance? That’s actually what’s left of a strip mall.”

That sounded like arrant bullshit, so I used my implant to pull pre-Nationfall maps off the network and compare them with current GPS data as we continued our hike. He was right about the road, but I remained skeptical about the forest’s ability to reclaim developed land in mere decades.

Suggested Listening

This is just a bit of fun. Naomi’s meeting all sorts of yummy guys, but none of ‘em are good for her. :)



Read the rest at Curiosity Quills.

Cover for Silent Clarion by Matthew Graybosch. Artwork by Polina Sapershteyn Cover for Silent Clarion by Matthew Graybosch. Artwork by Polina Sapershteyn

Read the rest at Curiosity Quills.

About Silent Clarion

My curiosity might get me killed. I thought I needed a vacation from my duties as an Adversary in service to the Phoenix Society. After learning about unexplained disappearances in a little town called Clarion, I couldn’t stop myself from checking it out.

Now I must protect a witness to two murders without any protection but my sword. I must identify a murderer who strikes from the shadows. I must expose secrets the Phoenix Society’s executive council is hellbent on keeping buried.

I have no support but an ally I dare not trust. If I cannot break the silence hiding what happened in Clarion’s past, I have no future. I must discover the truth about Project Harker. Failure is not an option.

Silent Clarion is a new-adult science-fiction thriller by Matthew Graybosch, set before the events of the Starbreaker novels. Meet Naomi Bradleigh as an Adversary, seventeen years before Without Bloodshed.

Silent Clarion is serialized and published at Curiosity Quills, every Wednesday.

Links

This week’s chapter: http://curiosityquills.com/serials/silent-clarion-chapter-fourteen/

Theme song: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l5aZJBLAu1E

Silent Clarion index: http://curiosityquills.com/published-authors/matthew-graybosch/silent-clarion/

Before Starbreaker, Curiosity Quills, naomi bradleigh, new adult, science fiction, serial, silent clarion, thriller

Originally posted at http://www.starbreakerseries.com/2014/10/15/silent-clarion-chapter-thirteen/

Tell your friends...Share on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on TumblrPin on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponShare on RedditBuffer this pagePrint this page
GamerGate in the Crosshairs

Taking Aim at GamerGate

I tried to ignore GamerGate, because I figured it was just another tempest in a toilet bowl. I’ll swear it by any demon you care to name. I tried, because while I play video games, I’m not a gamer and my involvement with the “gamer community” is peripheral at best. I tried to ignore this shit because that’s how our society says you’re supposed to deal with trolls and bullies.

The doxxing of gamer and actor Felicia Day was the last straw. Here was a woman whose love for video games and cameraderie with gamers is the foundation of her success, who apparently had the temerity, the unmitigated gall, to admit on her Tumblr that GamerGate scared her because she is a woman.

I’m not writing this tonight because I give a shit about Felicia Day. I’m not a fan of her work. She’s no friend of mine. But she’s a human being possessed of the same rights I claim for myself: the right to be left alone, in peace. This is about individual rights, not ‘social justice’.

Enough of This Nonsense

Here’s the deal. I am not afraid of GamerGate. Why should I be? I’m a white heterosexual cisgender educated working man who can fake being Christian when necessary. The only privilege I lack is the privilege of wealth.

I’m playing on Easy Mode, so when women I respect speak out against GamerGate, my pride demands I follow suit. What good is my privilege if I can’t do something constructive with it?

The only reason I’ve held my silence thus far is that I am not capable of reason when it comes to bullying. I’ve been bullied, and I know what it’s like. I know how it looks when other people are being bullied. GamerGate are a gang of bullies. Show me a bully, and I reach for a gun.

So come at me, dudebros. Come and pick on someone your own size, you sons of syphilitic bitches — and buy a copy of my book while you’re at it. Make yourselves useful for once in your miserable lives.

I Will Fear No Evil

How can I say what I’ve said? Simple. I’m not afraid of these assholes. I’ve already talked smack about GamerGate on Twitter. See for yourself.

That’s right, folks. I compared GamerGate to Daesh. Care to guess what happened to me after? Absolutely nothing.

I haven’t been doxxed. Nobody has issued death threats. Nobody will. Why? Because they’re the sort of chickenshit bullies I used to fight in high school. They go after perceived weakness.

Do they scare me? A little, but I’m going to have my say anyway. People who scare me also piss me off, and there’s nothing like rage to wash away fear.

GamerGate is a domestic terrorist campaign, and should be handled as such by the United States government. Its members should be identified, arrested, and given the due process of law.

Does this sound extreme? It isn’t compared to what I would really like to do to GamerGate supporters. Rather than go into detail, let’s just say that Vlad Tepes would have known how to deal with them. However, allow me to address the arguments a hypothetical reasonable GamerGate supporter might offer.

“B-B-But GamerGate is about Ethics in Journalism!”

This is an objection to anti-GamerGate posts and tweets I’ve seen entirely too often, mainly by people using the #NotYourShield hashtag. They believe in GamerGate’s stated aims while doing nothing meaningful about their movement’s actual practices.

You can’t claim your movement is about ethics in journalism when your members harass women online, drive them out of their homes with death threats, and force them to cancel speaking engagements by threatening to shoot up the venue. That shit doesn’t fly here.

The end doesn’t justify the means. It’s the other way around. The means justify the end. When you use evil methods to accomplish good aims, you blacken your cause. Why do you think Communism gets such a bad rap?

Don’t expect me to believe a word any supporter says about GamerGate. This is the root of GamerGate. Eron Gjoni’s treatment of his ex, Depression Quest developer Zoe Quinn, is the movement’s original sin. The attacks on Ms. Quinn, Anita Sarkeesian, Brianna Wu, Felicia Day, and too many other women put the lie to any high-minded rhetoric GamerGate might offer in its defense.

Whether he intended it or not, Eron Gjoni’s inability to suffer in silence stirred up an internet lynch mob. Nice going, Eron, you fucking dolt.

“B-B-But Feminists in the Media Say Mean Things About Gamers!”

Do I look like I give a flying fuck? Do I? So what if a bunch of feminist women with blogs are mean to gamers? I’m neither a feminist nor a woman, I’m being mean to you right now. Harden the fuck up, you pathetic losers!

If you’re a gamer who isn’t a straight white dude, the following doesn’t concern you. The rest of you better pay close attention. There will be a quiz later.

In case you haven’t noticed, video games are no longer the province of white middle-class teenage boys who sit in their rooms on weekends getting max prestige in Call of Duty: Nuclear Boogaloo or whatever EA calls their latest corn turd of a multiplayer military-themed shooter with a single-player campaign so short the game isn’t even worth renting.

They weren’t even the exclusive preserve of nerdy white dudes like me when I was a teenager in the 1990s, though I didn’t know better at the time.

Women play games now. Men who aren’t white play games now. QUILTBAG people play games now. They want to be represented in games. They want to be able to play as characters who look like them. They want to be the hero, just like you and me.

When you complain about games that let players create avatars who look like them, or speak in defense of game studios who refuse to provide such functionality, you look like a moron. From Software managed it in Demon’s Souls, Dark Souls, and Dark Souls II. Capcom managed it with Dragon’s Dogma BioWare managed it with the Mass Effect and Dragon Age games.

There is no excuse for not letting players have avatars that look like them, if that’s what they want. None whatsoever, and I’m saying this as a white heterosexual cisgender man.

Whether you like it or not, Anita Sarkeesian and other feminist critics aren’t just talking shit about your favorite games to make you feel like misogynistic pigs. She says what she says because all of our entire cultures throughout human history, all the stories we grow up hearing and reading and seeing on screens, is centered around powerful straight men — and that shit has to stop.

It will stop, whether you like it or not, because white dudes won’t be the majority of the American population and haven’t been for quite a while. It’s time you quit your whining and got with the program.

“B-B-But You Won’t Persuade Anybody This Way!”

I’m not here to persuade GamerGate supporters. This article isn’t for them. This article is for decent gamers who know GamerGate is nothing but an internet lynch mob, a small gang of domestic terrorists whose ideology is nothing but rank misogyny. This article is me speaking because my privilege lets me do so with an expectation of safety that others lack.

I’m speaking up because I’m a man who respects women and thinks that all people should have the same rights in society. That isn’t just social justice. It’s a libertarian respect for individual rights, and (not that I give a shit) the Christian thing to do.

“B-B-But Not All GamerGate Supporters Are Assholes.”

Yeah, and not all men are rapists. Not all Muslims are terrorists. Not all Christians are legalistic hypocrites who hate the poor and love money.

The problem with “Not all X are Y” is that that not all X have to be Y to make X dangerous to anybody who isn’t X. It’s the uncertainty, stupid. Remember what Felicia Day wrote? She used to be able to trust gamers. Now she can’t, because some of them might turn out to be hateful, misogynistic assholes.

“B-B-But You’re Fighting Hate with Hate.”

Damn right I am. I won’t apologize for the fact that I hate GamerGate, the misogyny and intolerance driving their actions, the disparity between their rhetoric and their actions, and everybody who supports them. I’m not the sort of person who fights hate with love. I save my love for those who deserve it.

The only thing GamerGate and its supporters deserve is the due process of law.

“B-B-But Your Header Image is Misogynistic.”

Make this argument, and you’re guilty of the ad hominem logical fallacy, and your argument is invalid. However, I’ll address this in further detail for people who might otherwise agree with me.

Vivian James isn’t a real person. She’s a mascot cooked up by 4chan to represent GamerGate. She is a symbol, not a person. I would not photoshop a set of crosshairs onto a photograph of a real person. I am an asshole, not an idiot.

I am using Vivian in this context to highlight the hypocrisy underlying GamerGate. This is a movement whose tactics have consisted mainly of harassing and attacking any woman who dares to speak out about problems in the game industry or games as an art form.

They hide behind a female cartoon character while targeting real women in real life. For this reason, and because Vivian James is a symbol, that symbol is fair game.

Also, I feel like trolling GamerGaters. These assholes troll everybody else; it’s high time somebody started ramming their own medicine down their throats.

You know damn well there’s at least one GamerGate supporter who has done worse than photoshop crosshairs onto pictures of Zoe Quinn, Anita Sarkeesian, Brianna Wu, or Felicia Day and post it on 4chan. What I did isn’t in the same league.

A Final Solution to GamerGate

Don’t worry, I’m not going to suggest that we deal with GamerGate by consigning them to a mass grave. Death is too good for them. Instead, we should subject them to the very thing they fear most…

Image by SheQuotes

…the contemptuous laughter of women and men who are better than they will ever be.

Laugh at them. Mock them. Counter their every public statement by challenging the disparity between their rhetoric and their tactics. If they want a war, let’s give ‘em one, and give it to ‘em good and hard.

Tell your friends...Share on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on TumblrPin on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponShare on RedditBuffer this pagePrint this page